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ANALYSIS OF FINDINGS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ON THE TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION PROGRAM FOR HEALTH

This document provides an index to the relevant research findings contained in Scientific Research on the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program: Collected Papers, Volumes 1 to 5 for Health. In it, you can find all the research papers pertaining to specific topics, such as aging, health of the different bodily systems, etc.


The following findings have been taken from the over 400 original scientific papers reprinted in Scientific Research on the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program: Collected Papers, Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 and listed in the first section of this book. Included are the results of many studies conducted in the context of the prevention and cure of illness and the promotion of perfect health, as well as the results of other research of particular relevance to this area. The numbers contained in the brackets after each finding refer to the designated numbers of the original research studies as they are reprinted in Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 , and 5 mentioned above.

Health

Aging

1. •   Benefits for the Elderly Demonstrating Reversal of Aging: Increased Longevity; Increased Cognitive Flexibility (Including Increased Learning Ability and Greater Perceptual Flexibility); Increased Word Fluency; Improvements in Self-Reported Measures of Behavioral Flexibility and Aging; Greater Sense of Well-being; Improved Mental Health; Reduction of Blood Pressure to More Ideal Levels (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
2. • Younger Biological Age Compared to Population Norms (Vol. 3: 242, 245, 246.)
3. • Younger Biological Age Compared with Control Subjects (Vol. 3: 242.)
4. • Longitudinal Reduction in Biological Age (Vol. 3: 246.)
5. •  70% Percent Reduction in Hospitalization in Individuals over 40 Years Old Who Practice Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation Program Compared with Norms (Vol. 5: 378.)
6. • Hormone Levels Indicating Younger Biological Age (Vol. 5: 376.)
7. • Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness and Slower Aging (Vol. 5: 377.)
8. • Reduction of Aging Effects as Assessed by Perceptual/Motor Speed and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol. 5: 393.)
9. • Duration of Practice of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program Found to Be Correlated with Younger Biological Age (Vol. 3: 242, 245, 246.)
10. • Duration of Practice of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program Found to Be Predictive of:
—Younger Physiological Age as Reflected in Levels of Systolic Blood Pressure and Auditory Threshold (Vol. 3: 245.)
—Superior Performance on Tests Measuring Age Related Psychological Variables: Visual Memory, Creativity, Field Independence, Perceptual Speed, Motor Speed, Reaction Time, and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol. 3: 257, Vol. 5: 393.)
11. • Faster Processing of Cognitively Complex Information in the Elderly as Measured by Event-Related Potentials (Vol. 5: 374.)
12. • Other Findings Indicating Reversal of the Aging Process (Vol. 1: 15, 18, 25–28, 31–42, 45–53, 55–58, 63, 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 87, 88, 103, 104; Vol. 2: 123–126, 128–130, 134, 136, 143, 147, 150, 158; Vol. 3: 195, 197, 202, 232, 233, 235, 236, 239. 240. 244. 248. 250. 251. 254–256. 259–261 268, 273, 277, 278, 280, 290; Vol. 4: 294, 299–301, 307.)
13. • Multiple Improvements in Factors Most Closely Associated with Longevity: Cardiovascular Health, Work Satisfaction, Positive Health Habits, Physical Function, Happiness Rating, Self-Health Rating, Intelligence, and Mental Health (Please Refer to Appropriate Findings throughout Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.)


Deep Rest: A Unique State of Deep Rest during Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation Program—The Perfect Means to Eliminate Stress and Promote Orderliness in Physiological Functioning
 
14. • Decreased Metabolic Rate: Decreased Oxygen Consumption (Vol. 1: 1–4, 6, 7, 9; Vol. 2: 108, 130; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 5: 357, 359.)
15. • Decreased Carbon Dioxide Elimination (Vol. 1: 1–4, 6, 7, 9; Vol. 3: 205.)
16. • Decreased Tidal Volume: (Vol. 1: 9; Vol. 4: 293.)
17. • Decreased Minute Ventilation (Vol. 1: 1, 3, 4, 7; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 4: 293.)
18. • Decreased Respiration Rate (Vol. 1: 2–5, 9, 10; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 197, 205.)
19. • Lower Respiration Rate than Ordinary Rest (Vol. 5: 356, 358.)
20. • Periodic Breath Suspension (Vol. 1: 7, 8; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358.)
21. •   Increased Ease of Breathing: Increased Airway Conductance  (Vol. 1: 6.)
22. • Decreased Heart Rate (Vol. 1: 1–4, 6; Vol. 2: 108; Vol. 3: 197, 205; Vol. 4: 302; Vol. 5: 357, 358.)
23. • Increased Blood Flow to the Brain (Vol. 2: 105, 106; Vol. 3: 194, 195.)
24. •   EEG Indications of a Unique State of Restful Alertness (Vol. 1: 1–4, 7, 14, 15, 17, 18; Vol. 2: 117; Vol. 3: 211, 213, 220; Vol. 5: 369.)
25. • Increased Basal Skin Resistance (Vol. 1: 1–4, 22–25; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 205; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 356.)
26. • Higher Basal Skin Resistance than Ordinary Rest (Vol. 5: 356.)
27. • Decreased Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses (Vol. 1: 25–27; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 197, 205.)
28. • Increased Muscle Relaxation (Vol. 1: 15; Vol. 2: 122; Vol. 3: 209, 212.)
29 • Reduced Difference between Arterial and Venous CO2 Content in Forearm Metabolism (Vol. 5: 361.)
30. • Reduced Metabolism in Muscle Tissue (Vol. 3: 207; Vol. 4: 291.)
31. • Reduced Glucose Metabolism in Red Blood Cells (Vol. 2: 112; Vol. 3: 203; Vol. 4: 292; Vol. 5: 362.)
32. • Reduction in Biochemical Indices of Stress:
—Decreased Arterial Lactate Levels (Vol. 1: 2–4; Vol. 3: 194, 203; Vol. 4: 291, 292.)
—Decreased Plasma Cortisol Levels (Vol. 1: 12; Vol. 2: 109, 111; Vol. 3: 190, 191, 200, 202.)
33. • Lower Plasma Lactate than Ordinary Rest (Vol. 5: 356.)
34. • Other Unique Changes in Biochemical and Hormonal Balance (Vol. 1: 13; Vol. 2: 107, 110, 113; Vol. 3: 192, 196, 198–200, 202, 204, 206, 208; Vol. 5: 363–368, 376.)
35. •   The Experience of Pure Consciousness Found to Be Associated with: High EEG Coherence; Marked Reductions in Respiration Rate, Heart Rate, and Metabolic Rate; Periodic Breath Suspension; Absence of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses; High Basal Skin Resistance (Vol. 1: 7; Vol. 3: 197, 205, 213; Vol. 4: 293; Vol. 5: 358.)

Stress Reactivity

383. • Biochemical Indications of Reduced Stress: Decreased Urinary Free Cortisol Levels (Vol. 2: 109.)
384. • Increased Autonomic Stability (Vol. 1: 25–28, 87; Vol. 2: 123, 130; Vol. 3: 197, 205; Vol. 5: 356.)
385. • More Effective Interaction with the Environment: Improved Resistance to Stress (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5: 370.)
386. • Improved Stress Reactivity: Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity; Lower Blood Reactivity to Stress; Lower Resting Blood Pressure; Lower Resting Epinephrine Level (Vol. 5: 367.)
387. • Lower Chronic Stress: Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity; Meditating Type A Subjects Showed Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
388. •  Maintenance of a Relaxed Style of Physiological Functioning Outside of Meditation (Vol. 1: 6, 18, 30; Vol. 3: 197; Vol. 5: 356, 358, 359.)
389. • Meta-Analysis Showing Lower Baseline Levels of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses, Respiration Rate, Heart Rate, and Plasma Lactate Outside the Practice (Vol. 5: 356.)
390. • Lower Resting Blood Pressure (Vol. 1: 32–34; Vol. 2: 124, 125; Vol. 3: 233, 235, 244–246; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 367, 380.)
391.  Maintenance of Physiological Relaxation during a Task (Vol. 2: 122.)
392. •  More Settled Physiological Response during Cognitively Demanding Tasks  (Vol. 5: 372.)
393. • Increased Physiological Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)
394. • Unique Pattern of DNA Repair (Vol. 5: 360.)

Health of the Cardiovascular System

36. •  Decreased Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Subjects (Vol. 1: 32–34; Vol. 2: 124, 125; Vol. 3: 233, 235, 238; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
37. •   Reduction of Blood Pressure to More Ideal Levels in Normatensive Subjects (Vol. 2: 124; Vol. 3: 233, 244–246; Vol. 5: 367, 380.)
38. • Lower Hospital Admissions Rate for Heart Disease (Vol. 5: 378)
39. • Decreased need for Anti-Hypertensives (Vol. 3: 238, 247.)
40. • Decreased Serum Cholesterol Levels in Normal and Hypercholesterolaemic Patients (Vol. 3: 202, 233, 236.)
41. • Improvements in Patients with Angina Pectoris:
—Improved Exercise Tolerance (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 3: 238.)
—Increased Maximum Workload (Vol. 1: 35.)
—Delayed Appearance of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities during Exercise: Delayed Onset of ST Segment Depression (Vol. 1: 35.)
—Decreased Double Product (Vol. 1: 35.)
42. •  Decreased Need for Drugs for Heart Disease (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 3: 238, 247.)
43. • Lower Baseline Levels of Heart Rate (Vol. 5: 356, 358.)
44. •   Improved Cardiovascular Efficiency (Vol. 1: 35; Vol. 2: 130.)
45. • Improved Blood Sugar Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (Vol. 3: 238.)

Health of the Respiratory System

46.  Improvements in Patients with Bronchial Asthma:
—Reduced Severity of Symptoms (Vol. 1: 2, 36–38; Vol. 3: 232, 238.)
—Reduced Airway Resistance (Vol. 1: 36–38.)
—Decreased Need for Anti-Asthmatic Drugs (Vol. 3: 238, 247.)
47. • Improvements in Patients with Chronic Bronchitis (Vol. 3: 238.)
48. • Fewer Upper Respiratory Tract Infections (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238.)
49. •   Improved Respiratory Efficiency (Vol. 1: 6; Vol. 2: 130.)
50. • Lower Hospital Admissions Rate for Nose, Throat, & Lung Diseases (Vol. 5: 378.)

Health of the Nervous System

51. •  Increased Orderliness of Brain Functioning (Vol. 4, 14–18, 20, 102; Vol. 2: 115, 117; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 211, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294–296.)
52. • Increased Integration of Brain Functioning (Vol. 1: 14–17, 20, 102; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 211, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294–296; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 375.)
53. •   Increased Brain Wave Coherence (Vol. 1: 20, 21, 102; Vol. 3: 205, 210, 213, 215, 217, 218, 224; Vol. 4: 294, 296; Vol. 5: 370, 371.)
54. • Increased EEG Coherence at the Moment of Performance of TM-Sidhi Yogic Flying (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 5: 375.)
55. • Increased EEG Coherence during Acquisition of New Information (Vol. 5: 372.)
56. • Increased Blood Flow to the Brain: The Basis of Optimizing Brain Functioning (Vol. 2: 105, 106; Vol. 3: 194, 195.)
57. •  Correlations Found in Subjects Practising Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program:
57a. —Between Duration of Practice of Transcendental Meditation and High EEG Coherence (Vol. 4: 296.)
57b. —Between High EEG Coherence, High Levels of Creativity, Neurological Efficiency, and Experience of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 1: 21.)
57c. —Between High EEG Coherence, Higher States of Consciousness, Experience of the TM-Sidhis, and High Levels of Creativity (Vol. 1: 102; Vol. 3: 216.)
57d. —Between Increased Frontal EEG Coherence and Increased Creativity (Vol. 4: 294.)
 57e. —Between High EEG Coherence, Neurological Efficiency, and Flexibility of Concept Learning (Vol. 3: 219.)
57f. —Between High EEG Coherence, Neurological Efficiency, and Superior Academic Performance (Vol. 3: 230, 231.)
 57g. —Between High EEG Coherence and Improved Performance in Mathematics (Vol. 3: 221.)
57h. —Between Changes in EEG Coherence and Increased Moral Maturity, Increased Intelligence, Improved Academic Performance, and Decreased Neuroticism (Vol. 4: 294.)
57i. —Between High EEG Coherence, High Levels of Principled Moral Reasoning, and a Unified Cosmic Perspective on Life (Vol. 3: 223.)
57j. —Between High EEG Coherence and More Ideal Social Behavior (Vol. 4: 297.)
57k. —Between High EEG Coherence and Self-Esteem and Social Self, One's Sense of Adequacy and in the General Social Environment (Vol. 5: 370.)
57l. Age-Related Psychological Variables (Vol. 3: 225.)
58. •  Increased Neurological Efficiency:
—Increased Efficiency of Information Transfer in the Brain (Vol. 2: 114, 116; Vol. 3: 214, 251; Vol. 5: 374.)
—Improved Spinal Reflex Activity (Vol. 3: 226, 227,229.)
—Improvements in Reaction-Time Measures Which are Correlated with Intelligence (Vol. 5: 390.)
59. • Greater Ability to Process Information at Speed (Vol. 2: 123.)
60. • Improved Left Hemispheric Functioning—Improved Verbal and Analytical Thinking (Vol. 1: 54–56, 58, 62, 63, 103; Vol. 2: 134; Vol. 3: 260, 265; Vol. 5: 387, 389, 390, 392.)
61. • Improved Right Hemispheric Functioning—Improved Synthetic and Holistic Thinking (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 2: 135, 140; Vol. 3: 257, 260; Vol. 5: 393.)
62. •  Increased Sensitivity, Strength, and Flexibility of the Nervous System (Vol. 4: 301.)
63. • Greater Adaptability of Brain Functioning (Vol 2: 120.)
64. •  Increased Order-Producing Activity  of the Brain during Sleep (Vol. 5: 373.)
65. •  Increased Cognitive Flexibility (Including Increased Learning Ability and Greater Perceptual Flexibility); Increased Word Fluency in the Elderly (Vol. 5: 380.)
66. • Faster Processing of Cognitively Complex Information in the Elderly as Measured by Event-Related Potentials (Vol. 5: 374.)

Health of the Autonomic Nervous System

67. • Increased Autonomic Stability (Vol. 1: 25–28, 87; Vol. 2: 123, 130; Vol. 3: 197, 205; Vol. 5: 356.)
68. • Lower Baseline Levels of Spontaneous Skin Resistance Responses, Respiration Rate, Heart Rate, and Plasma Lactate (Vol. 5: 356.)
69. • Increased Autonomic Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)
70. •  More Effective Interaction with the Environment: Improved Resistance to Stress (Vol. 1: 25–28; Vol. 2: 123; Vol. 5. 370.)
71. • Improved Temperature Homeostasis (Vol. 1: 31.)
72. •   More Efficient Neuroendocrine Regulation (Vol. 5: 364.)
73. • Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity: Meditating Type A Subjects Showed Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
74. •  Improved Stress Reactivity: Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity; Lower Blood Reactivity to Stress; Lower Resting Blood Pressure; Lower Resting Epinephrine Level (Vol. 5:  367.)

Beneficial Effects in Disorders of the Nervous System

92. • Lower Hospital Admissions Rate for Diseases of the Nervous System (Vol. 5: 378.)
93. •  Improvements in Patients with Epilepsy:
—Reduced Frequency and Severity of Seizures    (Vol. 3: 202.)
—Reduction of Abnormal EEG Features (Vol. 3: 202.)
—Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite Levels (Vol. 3: 202.)
94. • Decreased Stuttering (Vol. 1: 43; Vol. 4: 298.)

Health of The Endocrine System

95. • Decreased Physiological Stress: Lower Urinary Free Cortisol Levels (Vol. 2: 109)
96. • Increased Stability and Sensitivity of Control of Hormone Levels (Vol. 3: 206; 363, 364; Vol. 5: 363, 364.)
97 • Increased Endrocrinological Efficiency: Lower Baseline Levels of of Pituitary Hormones (TSH, Growth Hormone, and Prolactin) with Maintenance of Adrenal, Thyroid Hormone, and Insulin Levels in Long-Term TM participants (Vol. 5:  363, 364.)
98. • Increased Plasma Level of Arginine Vasopressin, Associated with Body Fluid Balance and with Learning and Memory (Vol. 5: 366.)
99. • Improved Glucose Tolerance (Vol. 3: 240; Vol. 4: 299.)
100. • Improved Stress Reactivity: Lower Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Sensitivity; Lower Resting Epinephrine Level  (Vol. 5: 367.)
101. • Normal Neuroendocrine Reactivity: Meditating Type A Subjects Showed Healthy Neuroendocrine Pattern (Vol. 5: 368.)
102. • Improved Blood Sugar Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (Vol. 3: 238.)
103. • Improvements in Patients with Menorrhagia (Vol. 3: 238.)
104. • Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness and Slower Aging (Vol. 5: 377.)
105. • Hormone Levels Indicating Younger Biological Age (Vol. 5: 376.)

Health of the Immune System—Increased Resistance to Disease

106. • Decreased Hospital Admission Rate for Infectious Diseases (Vol. 5: 378.)
107. •  Lower Health Care Utilization (Vol. 5: 378, 379.)
108. • Benefits for Individuals with Allergies (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238, 239.)
109. • Fewer Infections (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 238, 239.)
110.  Reduced Inflammation of the Gums (Vol. 1: 39; Vol. 3: 237, 238.)
111. • Decreased Need for Anti-Histamines (Vol. 3: 247.)
112. •  A unique Pattern of DNA Repair (Vol. 5: 360, 413.)

Health of the Musculo-Skeletal System

113. • Fewer Hospital Admissions for Bone and Muscle Diseases (Vol. 5: 378.)
114. • Improvements in Patients with Chronic Back Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Other Complaints (Vol. 3: 238.)
115. Perceptual/Motor Speed (Vol. 5: 393.) 
116. • General Improvements (Vol. 3: 241.)

Health of the Digestive System

117. • Fewer Hospital Admissions for Gastro-Intestinal Disorders and Irregularities of Metabolism (Vol. 5: 378.)
118. • General Improvements (Vol. 3: 239.)
119. • Improved Periodontal Health (Vol. 1: 39; Vol. 3: 237, 238.)
120. • Improvements in Patients with Dyspepsia, Chronic Colitis, and Other Complaints (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 238.)

Perceptual Ability

75. •  Improved Auditory Thresholds (Vol. 1: 104; Vol. 3: 245, 246, 252; Vol. 4: 301, 302.)
76. • Improved Auditory Discrimination (Vol. 1: 50; Vol. 2: 123, 128; Vol. 3: 256.)
77. • Improved Efficiency of Visual Perception and Increased Freedom from Habitual Patterns of Perception (Vol. 3: 253; Vol. 4: 300.)
78. •    Lower Incidence of Perceptual Illusion (Vol. 2: 131.)
79. • Increased Perceptual Flexibility (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 3: 250, 253; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
80. • Increased Perceptual Speed (Vol. 3: 257.)
81. • Increased Vigilance and Improved Capacity for Selective Attention (Vol. 3: 251; Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
82. •  Increased Field Independence: Growth of a Stable Internal Frame of Reference (Vol. 1: 51, 52, 103; Vol. 3: 255, 257, 259; Vol. 4: 307; Vol. 5: 384, 389.)
83. •  Improved Perceptual/Motor Speed and Non-Verbal Intelligence (Vol. 5: 393.)
84. • Reduction of Aging Effects as Assessed by Perceptual/Motor Speed (Vol. 5: 393.)

Mind-Body Co-ordination

85. • Faster Reactions (Vol. 1: 45–47, 53; Vol. 2: 129; Vol. 3: 248, 251, 254, 257; Vol. 4: 301; Vol. 5: 358, 390.)
86. • Superior Perceptual-Motor Performance (Vol. 1:  48, 49.)
87. • Increased Psycho-Motor Speed (Vol. 1: 103; Vol. 3: 250, 257; Vol. 5: 393.)
88. •  Increased Functional Efficiency of Psycho-Motor Co-ordination (Vol. 3: 250.)
89. •  Improved Motor-Cognitive Flexibility (Vol. 1: 103.)
90. • Improved Athletic Performance and Neuromuscular Integration: Improved Running Speed, Agility, and Standing Broad Jump (Vol. 2: 130.)
91.  • Correlations Found between Experiences of Higher States of Consciousness and Superior Performance on Tests Measuring Perceptual Speed, Flexibility, Creativity, Intelligence, Field Independence, and Psycho-Motor Speed in Subjects Practising the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program (Vol. 3: 258.)

Health for Mother and Child during Pregnancy and Childbirth

121. • Fewer Medical Complaints during Pregnancy (Vol. 3: 234.)
122. • Less Anxiety during Pregnancy and Childbirth (Vol. 3: 234.)
123.  Less Pain during Pregnancy and Childbirth (Vol. 3: 234.)
124. • Shorter Duration of Labour (Vol. 3: 234.)
125. • Lower Frequency of Vacuum or Forceps Delivery and Other Operative Interventions during Labour (Vol. 3: 234.)
126. • Increased Quiet Alertness in Newborns of Mothers Practicing Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program (Vol. 5: 381.) 
127. • Shorter Stay in the Hospital for Child Delivery (Vol. 5: 378.)  
128. • Greater Frequency and Longer Duration of Breast-Feeding (Vol. 3: 234.)

Health Habits

129. • Decreased Use of Cigarettes (Vol. 1: 80, 84; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 161–163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 276, 280, 287; Vol. 5; 399.)
130. • Decreased Use of Alcohol (Vol. 1: 73, 80, 83–85, 95; Vol. 2: 126, 150, 153, 162, 163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 282, 283, 287; Vol. 4: 313; Vol. 5: 399.)
131.  • Decreased Drug Abuse (Vol. 1: 73, 79–82, 84–86, 89, 90, 95; Vol. 2: 153, 161–163; Vol. 3: 239, 247, 277, 282, 287; Vol. 5: 421.)
132. • Decreased Intake of Caffeine (Vol. 2: 163; Vol. 3: 239.)
133. • Increased Co-operation with Medical Advice (Vol. 3: 238.)

General Health

134. Fewer Hospital Inpatient Days, and Outpatient Visits in All Age Categories; Fewer Inpatient Admissions for All Major Categories of Disease (Vol. 5: 378.)
135. • Lower Health Insurance Utilization Rates among MIU Faculty and Staff (Vol. 5: 379.)
136. • Unique Pattern of DNA Repair (Vol. 5: 360.)
137. • Lower Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Levels Indicating Less Serious Illness (Vol. 5: 377.)
138. • Maintenance of a Relaxed Style of Physiological Functioning Outside of Meditation (Vol. 1: 6, 18, 30; Vol. 3: 197; Vol. 5: 356.)
139. • Maintenance of Physiological Relaxation during a Task (Vol. 2: 122; Vol. 5: 372, 399.)
140. • Faster Recovery from Exertion (Vol. 1: 31, 53.)
141. •   Increased Energy and Endurance (Vol. 1: 62; Vol. 2: 130; Vol. 3: 238.)
142. •  mprovements in Sleeping and Dreaming Patterns:
142a. —Relief from Insomnia (Vol. 1: 41, 42, 95; Vol. 3: 238, 243; Vol. 4: 313.)
142b. —Decreased Time to Fall Asleep (Vol. 1: 41, 42; Vol. 2: 126, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314.)
142c. —Decreased Awakenings per Night (Vol. 2: 126, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314.)
142d. —Improved Quality of Sleep (Vol. 2: 126, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 278, 280; Vol. 4: 314; Vol. 5: 399.)
142e. —Decreased Time to Awaken Fully Vol. 2: 126.)
142f. —Increased Restedness on Awakening (Vol. 2: 126.)
142g—Decreased Drowsiness (Vol. 2: 126, 147.)
142h. —Decreased Lethargy (Vol. 2: 126, 147.)
142i. —Decreased Daytime Napping (Vol. 2: 126.)
142j. —Decrease in Number of Dreams Remembered (Vol. 2: 126.)
142k. —Decrease in Complexity of Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
142l. —Decrease in Unpleasant Emotional Content of Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
142m. —Decrease in Recurring Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
142n. —Decrease in Unpleasant Emotional Content of
Dreams (Vol. 2: 126.)
142o. —Increased Order-Producing Activity  of the Brain during Sleep (Vol. 5: 373.)
142p. —Decreased Need for Sleep Medications (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 126, 153; Vol. 3: 238, 239, 247.)
142q. —Faster Recovery from Sleep Deprivation (Vol. 1: 40.)
143. • Decreased Fatigue (Vol. 2: 147; Vol. 3: 238.)
144. • Improvements in General Physical and Mental Well-Being in Individuals under Medical Care (Vol. 3: 238, 243.)
145. • Improved Self-Health Rating (Vol. 1: 2; Vol. 3: 239, 247 Vol. 5: 399, 414.)
146. • Decreased Susceptibility to, and Discomfort from, Physical and General Complaints (Vol. 3: 241.)
147. •  Benefits for Patients Recovering from Serious Illnesses (Vol. 3: 232, 238.)
148. • Improved Mental and Physical Health in Patients on a Kidney Transplant/Dialysis Program (Vol. 2: 125.)
149. •  Fewer Domestic, Work, Road, and Other Accidents (Vol. 3: 239.)
150. • Improvements in Patients with Chronic Headaches (Vol. 1: 2, 95; Vol. 3: 238, 243.)
151. • Decreased Need for Analgesics (Vol. 2: 150, 153; Vol. 3: 239, 247.)
152. • Normalization of Body Weight:
—More Successful Weight Reduction in Obese Subjects (Vol. 3: 238, 290.)
—Changes towards Ideal Body Weight in Both Overweight and Underweight Subjects (Vol. 1: 44; Vol. 3: 238.)
—Improved Psychological Health in Subjects Undertaking Dietary Treatment for Obesity (Vol. 3: 290.)
153.  Improvements in Patients with Skin Disorders:
—Less Eczema (Vol. 3: 239.)
—Decreased    (Vol. 1: 95.)
154. • Reduced Need for Medical Attention (Vol. 2: 126.)
155. •   Improvements in Physical Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of Practice of Transcendental Meditation (Vol. 3: 247.)
156. •  Benefits for the Elderly:
—Increased Longevity (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
 —Increased Cognitive and Perceptual Flexibility
(Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
—Increased Behavioral Flexibility (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
—Improved Mental Health (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 380, 395, 396.) 
—More Ideal Levels of Blood Pressure (Vol. 4: 300; Vol. 5: 380.)
157. • Improvements in Mental Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of Practice of Transcendental Meditation (Vol. 3: 247.)
158. • Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
159. • Improved Family Health (Vol. 5: 400.)

Energy and Vitality

251. •  Faster Reactions (Vol. 1: 45–47; Vol. 2: 129; Vol. 3: 248, 251, 254, 257; Vol. 4: 301; Vol. 5: 358, 390.)
252. • Increased Readiness for Activity (Vol. 1: 65; Vol. 2: 147.)
253. •   Increased Alertness (Vol. 1: 29; Vol. 2: 164; Vol. 4: 308.)
254. • Increased Enthusiasm for Work (Vol. 2: 150; Vol. 5: 399.)
255. • Increased Liveliness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290.)
256. • Increased Vigor (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277.)
257. • Increased Energy and Endurance (Vol. 1: 62; Vol. 2: 130.)
258. • Increased Persistence (Vol. 2: 153.)
259. •   Growth of a More Brave, Adventurous, Action-Oriented Nature (Vol. 1: 73.)
260. •   Increased Physical and Mental Well-Being (Vol. 4: 308; Vol. 5: 380, 395.)

Mental Health

160. •  Increased Psychological Health (Vol. 1: 64–78,  81, 87–95; Vol. 2: 141–161, 164, 165; Vol. 3: 266–275, 277–281, 283, 284, 288; Vol. 4: 308–316; Vol. 5: 370, 371, 380, 394–397, 399, 400.)
161. • Lower Health Insurance Utilization for All Mental Disorders (Vol. 5: 378.)
162. • Improvements on Mental Health Positively Correlated with Duration and Regularity of Practice of Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation Program ( Vol. 3: 247.)
163. •  Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
164. • Orientation toward Positive Values (Vol. 5: 394.)
165. • Greater Sense of Well-Being (Vol. 5: 380, 395.)
166. • Psychological Health Associated with Physiological Indicators of Transcendental Consciousness (Vol. 5: 396.) 

Negative Personality Characteristics

261. • Decreased Anxiety (Vol. 1: 33, 35, 61, 62, 68, 71, 72, 74, 75, 78, 81, 84, 88–90, 92, 93, 95; Vol. 2: 125, 133, 138, 143, 145, 148, 150, 153, 154, 157, 160; Vol. 3: 234, 238, 268, 273, 275, 278, 280, 281, 284, 288, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 310, 311, 313, 314, 316; Vol. 5: 370, 399.)
262. • Decreased Tension (Vol. 1: 65, 77, 81; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 157; Val. 3: 277, 281, 284; Vol. 4: 308; Vol. 5: 399.)
263. • Decreased Nervousness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 2: 147; Vol. 3: 273, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
264. •  Decreased Neuroticism (Vol. 1: 54, 55, 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 92; Vol. 2: 137, 158; Vol. 3: 267, 269, 277, 278, 280; Vol. 4: 308, 310; Vol. 5: 370.)
265. • Decreased Hidden Mental Turbulence (Vol. 3: 269.)
266. • Decreased Somatic Neurotic Instability (Vol. I: 55.)
267. • Decreased Psychosomatic Disturbance (Vol. I: 65, 77, 95; Vol. 3: 232, 241, 277, 290.)
268. • Decreased Depression (Vol. 1: 65, 67, 74, 77, 78, 95; Vol. 2: 143, 147, 150, 158; Vol. 3: 238, 239, 268, 273, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308, 313.)
269. • Decreased Instability and Hypochondriacal and Neurasthenic Symptoms (Vol. 2: 153.)
270. • Decreased Hypochondria (Vol. 1: 93.)
271. • Decreased Sense of Physical Inadequacy (Vol. 1: 67.)
272. • Decreased Vulnerability (Vol. 2: 147.)
273. • Decreased Frustration (Vol. 2: 153.)
274. • Decreased Irritability (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 77; Vol. 2 147, 158, 164; Vol. 3: 278; Vol. 4: 308.)
275. • Decreased General Maladjustment; Decreased Personality Disorder (Vol. 5: 371.)
 276. • Decreased Aggressiveness (Vol. 1: 65, 73, 74, 77, Vol. 2: 147, 158; Vol. 3: 284, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
277. • Decreased Hostility (Vol. 2: 142, 143, 158, 160 Vol.3: 278, 280; Vol.4: 314.)
278. • Decreased Impulsiveness (Vol. 1: 71; Vol. 2: 138, 157; Vol. 4: 316.)
279. • Increased Emotional Strength: Decreased Unwelcome Thoughts and Compulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 150.)
280. Decreased Psychoticism (Vol. 1: 92.)
281. • Increased Emotional Harmony and Absence of Regressive Behavior (Vol. 2: 150.)
282. • Decreased Need for Tranquillizers (Vol. 1: 35, 95; Vol. 2:150, 153, 163; Vol.3: 238, 239, 243, 247, 267.)
283. • Decreased Need for Anti-Depressants (Vol. 3: 247.)
284. • Decreased Use of Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Drugs (Please Refer to Findings on 'Improved Health Habits' Listed Above)
285. • Orientation toward Positive Values: Better Recall for Positive than Negative Words; Lower Recognition Thresholds for Positive Words than Negative Words; Differential Recognition Threshold for Positive and Negative Affect Terms Correlated with the Intensity of the Experienced Positive and Negative Affects; More Positive Appraisal of Others (Vol. 5: 394.)
 
Benefits in Psychiatry

286. • Prevention of Psychiatric Illness (Vol. 2: 127.)
287. • Improvements in Anxiety Neurosis (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 238.)
288. • Improvements in Obsessive-Compulsive Neurosis (Vol.
1: 95.)
289. • Improvements in Depression (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3:
238.)
290. • Improvements in Psychosomatic Disorders (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 3: 232.)
291. • Improvements in Schizophrenia (Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 281, 283.)
292. • Improvements in Manic-Depressive Psychosis (Vol. 3: 281.)
293. • Improvements in Addictive Disorders, Including Alcoholism, Drug Abuse, and Gambling (Vol. 1: 95; Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 83.)
294. •  More Effective Rehabilitation of Patients following Discharge from a Vocational Rehabilitation Unit:
—Greater Ability to Maintain Employment (Vol. 3: 283.)
—More Often Maintained on Out-Patient Care Alone (Vol. 3: 283.)
295. • Improvements in Personality Disorders (Vol. 2: 157; Vol. 3: 281.)
296. • Decreased Overactive and Impulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 157.)
297. • Improvements in Aggressive Psychiatric Patients:
—Decreased Frequency and Severity of Attacks of Aggressive Behavior (Vol. 3: 202.)
—Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite and Plasma Cortisol Levels (Vol. 3: 202.)
298. • Improvements in Autism: Decreased Echolalic Behavior (Vol. 3: 262.)
299. • Benefits for Mentally Retarded Subjects:
—Improved Social Behavior (Vol. 3: 263.)
—Improved Cognitive Functioning (Vol. 3: 202, 263.)
—Increased Intelligence (Vol. 3: 202, 263.)
—Improved Physical Health (Vol. 3: 263.)
—Normalization of Neurotransmitter Metabolite and Plasma Cortisol Levels (Vol. 3: 202.)
300. • Improvements in Post-Traumatic Adjustment Problems:
—Decreased Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Vol. 4: 313)  
—Decreased Anxiety (Vol. 4: 313.)
—Decreased Depression (Vol. 4: 313.)
—Decreased Alcohol Consumption (Vol. 4: 313.)
—Decreased Insomnia (Vol. 4: 313.)
—Improved Employment Status (Vol. 4: 313.)
—Decreased Family Problems (Vol. 4: 313.)

Benefits in Special Education

301. • Increased Self-Actualization with Regard to Aspects of Personality Relevant to Learning Disorders in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems: Increased Independence and Self-Supportiveness, and Improved Self-Regard (Vol. 2: 139.)
302. • Decreased Dropout Rate from School in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (Vol. 2: 139.)
303. •   Benefits for Children with Learning Problems: Decreases in Anxiety, Examination Anxiety, and School Dislike (Vol. 2: 133.)
304. • Decreased Stuttering (Vol. 1: 43; Vol. 4: 298.)
305. • Decreased Overactive and Impulsive Behavior (Vol. 2: 157.) 
306. • Improvements in Autism: Decreased Echolalic Behavior (Vol. 3: 262.)

Social Behavior

307. • Increased Ability to See Man as Essentially Good (Vol. 1: 76; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 3: 266; Vol. 5: 394.)
308. •   Increased Social Maturity (Vol. 2: 138; Vol. 3: 261; Vol. 5: 371.)
309. •  Greater Sense of Social Responsibility (Vol. 2: 138,158.)
310. • Increased Sociability (Vol. 1: 65, 71, 73, 77; Vol.   2: 138; Vol. 3: 261, 266, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 316.)
311. •  Less Sense of Social Inadequacy (Vol. 3: 266.)
311a.  •  Decreased Social Introversion (Vol. 1: 87.)
312. •   Increased Outgoingness and Tendency to Participate (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 150, 153.)
313. •   Increased Capacity for Warm Interpersonal Relationships (Vol. 1: 69, 70, 73, 76, 77; Vol. 2: 149, 151,153; Vol. 3: 268, 277, 290; Vol. 4: 316.)
314. •   Increased Friendliness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290.)
315. •  Greater Respect for the Views of Others (Vol. 2: 164.)
316. • Improved Ability to Appreciate Others (Vol. 3:   271.) 
317. •  Greater Attentiveness to Others (Vol. 2: 164.)
318. •  Increased Ability to Co-operate with Others (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 161, 164.)
319. •   Improved Work and Personal Relationships (Vol. 5: 399.)
320. • Decreased Tendency to Dominate (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 268, 290.)
321. • Increased Ability to Be Objective, Fair-Minded, and Reasonable (Vol. 4: 316.)
322. • Increased Consideration for Others (Vol. 1: 71, 73; Vol. 2: 153.)
323. • Increased Good-Naturedness, Friendliness, and Loyalty (Vol. 1: 73.)
324. • Increased Ability to Express One’s Feelings Spontaneously (Vol. 1: 64, 69, 70, 76; Vol. 2: 151, 153; Vol. 4: 316.)
325. •   Increased Good Humor (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 277, 290; Vol. 4: 308.)
326. •  Increased Trust (Vol. 1: 67; Vol. 2: 138, 150.)
 326a. • Increased Tolerance (Vol. 1: 62, 65, 77; Vol. 2: 150, 153, 164; Vol. 3: 266, 268; Vol. 4: 308, 316.)
327. •   Growth of a More Sympathetic, Helpful, and Caring Nature (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 153; Vol. 4: 316.)
328. • Greater Empathy (Vol. 2: 149.)
329. • Increased Sensitivity to the Feelings of Others (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 4: 304, 316.)
330. • Growth of a More Tactful, Forgiving, and Agreeable Nature (Vol. 1: 73; Vol. 2: 153.)
331. •   Greater Regard for Etiquette (Vol. 2: 153.)
332. • Increased Respectfulness (Vol. 1: 65, 77; Vol. 3: 290.)
333. •  Greater Tolerance of Authority (Vol. 2: 138.)
334. •  Greater Selectivity in Personal Relationships (Vol. 3: 268.)
335. • Less Interest in Superficial Social Contacts (Vol. 3: 268.)
336. • Effective Rehabilitation (Vol. 1: 87–89; Vol. 2: 158, 160, 161; Vol. 3: 278–280, 284–286; Vol. 4: 350, 352, 353; Vol. 5: 398, 420.)
 
Marital Satisfaction

337. • Improved Family Life (Vol. 5: 400.)
338. •  Greater Adjustment (Vol. 2: 165; Vol. 4: 315.)
339. •   Greater Happiness (Vol. 2: 165.)
340. • Greater Harmony (Vol. 2: 165.)
341. •   Greater Intimacy (Vol. 2: 165.)
342. • Greater Acceptance of One’s Spouse (Vol. 2:
165.)
343. •  Greater Admiration of One’s Spouse (Vol. 2:
165.)
344. •  Greater Agreement on Conduct (Vol. 2: 165.)
345. • Greater Agreement on Recreation (Vol. 2: 165.)

Workplace

346. •   Increased Job Satisfaction (Vol. 1: 96, 97; Vol. 5: 399.)
347. •  Improved Relations with Co-Workers (Vol. 1: 96,
97.)
348. •  Improved Relations with Supervisors (Vol. 1: 96,
97.)
349. •  Improved Job Performance (Vol. 1: 96, 97; Vol.
2: 161; Vol. 5: 399.)
350. • Increased Productivity (Vol. 1: 96, 97.)
351. •   Greater Ability to Accomplish More with Less Effort (Vol. 2: 130, 164.)
352. •  Greater Organizational Ability (Vol. 2: 164.)
353. •  Greater Initiative (Vol. 2: 164.)
354. •  Greater Ability to Assign Priorities (Vol. 2: 164.)
355. •  Greater Decision Making Ability (Vol. 2: 164.)
356. •  Reduced Anxiety about Promotion (Vol. 1: 96.)
357. •  Reduced Job Worry and Tension (Vol. 5: 399.)
358. • Improved Physiological Stability during Task Performance (Vol. 5: 399.)

359. •  Decreased Desire to Change Jobs (Vol. 1: 96.)

Creating Unbounded Awareness—To Neutralize the Boundaries Caused by Routine Work

395. • Experience of Pure Consciousness during Transcendental Meditation (Vol. 1: 2, 7, 8, 20, 21, 99–102; Vol. 3: 197, 213, 216, 218, 258.)
396. • Growth of Higher States of Consciousness (Vol. 1: 19, 99–104; Vol. 3: 216, 258, 284; Vol. 4: 312; Vol. 5: 412, 418, 419, 423–430.)
397. • Experiences of Higher States of Consciousnesss: More Frequent Experiences of Transcendental Consciousnesss (Vol. 5:  397.)
398. • Scores on Psychological Health Associated with Physiological Indicators of Transcendental Consciousnesss (Vol. 5: 396.)
399. • Physiological Correlates of Higher States of Consciousness Developed through  Maharishi's  Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program (Vol. 5: 412.)

Also see:

Increased Intelligence, Learning Ability, Intellectual Performance and Increased Creativity

Increased Integration of Personality and Growth of Higher States of Consciousness


Health of Society

Improved Health of Society through the Maharishi Effect

The following research findings demonstrate that one percent of a population practising the Transcendental Meditation program or the square root of one percent collectively practising the TM-Sidhi program radiate a powerful influence of coherence and harmony in collective consciousness bringing life in accordance with all the laws of nature, neutralizing negative tendencies and promoting positive trends in society as a whole.

360. •  Decreased Incidence of Infectious Diseases (Vol. 4: 337, USA and Australia, 1983–1984.)
361. •  Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by an Index Including: Rate of Infectious Diseases, Infant Mortality Rate, Suicide Rate, Cigarette Consumption, Alcohol Consumption, Divorce Rate, Traffic Fatalities, Crime Rate, Percentage of Civil Cases Reaching Trial, Gross National Product, Patent Application Rate, and Number of Degrees Conferred (Vol. 4: 332, USA, 1976–1983.)
362. •   Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by a Weekly Index of Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicide, and Suicide (Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
363. •  Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by Reductions of Weekly Fatalities Due to Accidents Other than Motor
Vehicle Fatalities (Vol. 5: 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
364. •  Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by Improvements on a  Monthly Index Including Violent Fatalities (Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicide, and Suicide), Cigarette Consumption, and Worker-Days Lost in Strikes (Vol. 5: 408, Canada, 1972–1986.)
365. •  Increased Positivity in National Mood (Vol. 4: 333, Israel, 1983.)
366.  •  Improved Quality of Provincial Life as Measured by an Index Including: Mortality Rate, Cigarette Consumption Rate, Beer Consumption Rate, Motor Vehicle Fatality Rate, Auto Accident Rate, Pollution, Unemployment Rate, and Total Crime Rate,  (Vol. 4: 321 and Vol. 5: 401, Rhode Island, USA, 1978.)
367. •  Improved Quality of Provincial Life as Measured by an Index Including: Foetal Deaths, Other Deaths, and Crime (Vol. 5: 401, Metro Manila Region, Philippines, 1979–1981.)
368. •   Decreased Suicide Rate (Vol. 4: 317, Cities, USA, 1973—1977; Vol. 4: 323 and Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
369. •  Decreased Fires (Vol. 4: 333, Jerusalem, Israel, 1983.)
370. •  Decreased Motor Vehicle Accidents and Fatalities (Vol. 4: 317, Cities, USA, 1973–1977; 323, USA, 1979; 325, Holland, 1979; 327, USA, 1982; 333, Jerusalem, Israel, 1983; 337, USA, South Africa, and States of New South Wales, Victoria, and Western Australia, Australia, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 407, USA, 1979–1985; 408, Canada, 1983–1985.)
371. •  Decreased Air Traffic Fatalities and Fatal Accidents (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984.)
372. •  Decreased Crime (Vol. 1: 98, Cities, USA, 1973; Vol. 2: 166, Cities, USA, 1974–1976; Vol. 4: 318, Cities, USA, 1973–1978; Vol. 4: 319, Cities, USA, 1974–1976; Vol. 4: 320 and Vol. 5: 402, Metropolitan Areas, USA, 1973–1979; Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; Vol. 4: 325, Holland, 1979 and 1981; Vol. 4: 326 and Vol. 5: 401, Delhi, India, 1980–1981; Vol. 4: 328 and Vol. 5: 402, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; Vol. 4: 333, Jerusalem and Israel, 1983; Vol. 4: 334 and Vol. 5: 401, Puerto Rico, USA, 1984; Vol. 4: 337, State of Victoria, Australia, Washington, D.C., USA, and Karachi, Pakistan, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 401 Metro Manila, Philippines 1984–1985; Vol. 5: 408, Canada,1972–1986.)
373. •  Decreased Turbulence and Violence in Society (Vol. 4: 322, Iran, Nicaragua, and Rhodesia [Zimbabwe], 1978; Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
374. •  Decreased War Intensity and War Deaths (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 331, Lebanon, 1982–1984; 333, Lebanon, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985; 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
375. •  Increased Progress towards Peaceful Resolution of Conflict (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 335, Lebanon, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987; 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
376. •  Reduction of Conflict (Increased Cooperation, Reduced Level of Conflict, Reduced War Fatalities, and Reduced War Injuries); Improvement on a Daily Index Composed of All Four of These Variables (Vol. 5: 410, Lebanon, 1983–1985.)
377. •  More Positive, Evolutionary Statements and Actions of Heads of State (Vol. 4: 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987.)
378. •  Increased Harmony in International Affairs (Vol. 4: 322, Worldwide, 1978; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 409, USA, 1985–1987.)
379. •  Improved International Relations: Reduced Conflict Globally, Reduced Terrorism, and Increase in World Index of Stock Prices, during Three Large Assemblies of Participants in the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program (Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide,1983–1985.)
380. •  Improved Economy as Measured by a Monthly Index of Inflation and Unemployment, Controlling for Changes in Major Economic Variables (Vol. 5: 404–406, USA, 1979–1988; 403, USA and Canada,1979–1988.)
381. •  Increased Confidence, Optimism, and Economic Prosperity: Improvement in Economic Indicators (Vol. 4: 323, USA, 1979; 329, Washington, D.C., USA, 1981–1983; 330, United Kingdom, 1982–1983; 333, Israel, 1983; 335, Lebanon, 1984; 336, Worldwide, 1983–1984; 337, Worldwide, 1983–1984; Vol. 5: 411, Worldwide, 1983–1985.)
382.  •  Increased Creativity as Measured by Increased Patent Application (Vol. 4: 337, USA, Australia, South Africa, and United Kingdom, 1983–1984.)

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